Here’s some inside info on what our Advisory Board members recommended to students looking for jobs in the web:

  • Work on soft skills; communication, professional emails (no txt speak 4 u!), phone conversation skills, group communication, pitching a concept, dealing with a pushy client, etc.
  • Small firms hire more generalists, large teams hire more specialists.
  • Make sure the source code of your portfolio is valid, clean, well commented, and flexible in all browsers.
  • Some mentioned they will scale the browser to look for adaptive/responsive techniques or cleverness
  • Make sure your work looks presentable in even old browsers. Use progressive enhancement and degrade gracefully
  • Explain your objectives for each project (do not just rattle off the specs the instructor or client gave you). Be able to explain the problem and how you solved it.
  • Show that you have a thoughtful approach towards what technology is best for the job at hand, rather than just using tools you are comfortable with
  • Show your passion for the web. Create small, clever personal projects that show you are a tinkerer and explorer. Experiments are encouraged!.
  • Show a willingness to learn. the web is always changing and your education is not “done” when you step out of the classroom.
  • Embrace the fact that the web is a “moving target,” and you will constantly be learning on the job. Even seasoned professionals pick up new techniques with every project.
  • Be a problem solver and thinker if you want to “make the big bucks.”  Anyone can memorize code syntax and spit out work. Solving problems elegantly is in demand!
  • Practice estimating scope so you can spot scope creep, and budget your time, as well as estimate how long it will take you to do something.
  • Show your ability to leverage and integrate third party systems, like WordPress, jQuery plugins, Social media, Mailchimp, Wufoo, etc.
  • Be aware of (but not necessarily a master of) modern code techniques– like LESS, SASS– Frameworks- like GetSkeleton, Bootstrap– Version control systems-like Git, SVN, etc. Be willing to learn these things if your employer utilizes them. These tools are all designed to work with the fundamental languages you know, and speed up workflow.
  • Be well-rounded in your influences. Explore new cultures, Try different experiences, Observe and embrace human behavior. Don’t just imitate things you see on the web.
  • Remember, Companies hire people they want to work with. Be sociable, communicative, willing to reach out for help, willing to admit you don’t know everything.